In our latest issue of the Switched-On Online Magazine, Ruben expounded upon the issue of cheating on academic work, and its long-term detrimental…

In our latest issue of the Switched-On Online Magazine, Ruben expounded upon the issue of cheating on academic work, and its long-term detrimental effects on the work ethic of teenagers.   Having seen such cheaters rise in academic rankings at my own school, I’m frustrated that the problem of cheating doesn’t seem to have been fully addressed by the authorities at my school. There have been students who have tried to bring the issue to the attention of our instructors, but as of yet there have been little effective consequences for people who have been caught cheating. The problem is that once students are punished, many resort to their old ways and continue to gain from another student’s work. They develop more deceptive practices in cheating which in effect make it difficult for instructors to catch them in the act again.

Would more stringent punishments be more or less effective in discouraging cheating? Would discouraging cheating at an early age be effective?

– Allyson