Being diplomatic is one of the best skills we can learn in the work world. Everyone has opinions, but not everyone needs to know them. The fact is,…

Being diplomatic is one of the best skills we can learn in the work world. Everyone has opinions, but not everyone needs to know them. The fact is, not everyone’s your best friend, so they don’t need to know all your views on life. Sometimes it’s best to keep them on the inside so the chance of an argument doesn’t even come up. You’re the only person in the world who feels the exactly the way you feel about every topic in the world, so there will always be something that’s not perfect about someone. Best thing is to not even bother asking about these opinions and views. Enjoying someone’s company without caring what their religion is, if they’re Democrat or Republican, what their genealogy is, can be a really nice thing. It’s kind of weird, but our society categorizes everyone and everything. Within those categories we develop stereotypes. Although we know something is untrue, the more we hear something over and over the more we start to believe it is true. So the more we know about someone, the more categories we place them in, and the more stereotypes we can assume about them in our subconscious. For example, I’m a huge gay rights activist. I find people who I click with so well, we are having the best time, and then I want to get to know them better so I ask “What’s your view on gay rights?” The second they say they’re against it, I want nothing to do with them. Somehow you feel like they’re not a good person if they don’t have the same ideas on certain things as you do. Our own opinions can get in the way of making some pretty good connections.   – Kelsey