When it’s cold you think of yourself. How am I going to get here, there, home, through the snow, over the ice, up the stairs. We sometimes think so…

When it’s cold you think of yourself. How am I going to get here, there, home, through the snow, over the ice, up the stairs. We sometimes think so much of ourselves we forget about others. This year in early November I broke bruised the bones in my big toe where the joints are, and couldn’t walk. I’ve been on crutches for 11 weeks now. Since I wasn’t walking on my foot, my body thought I didn’t want it any more and started to cut off the circulation. The purple color you get when you put tape really tightly around your finger, was the color equivalent to my entire foot. It was so painful that if anything touched it I would flinch and quickly pull my foot away. Over time the blood flow became so weak that my nerves didn’t react to the pain till 15-30 seconds after. I was officially crippled. I had never realized how hard it was for people with mobility issues in the winter. I hadn’t known anyone permanently on crutches, and it just never occurred to me. I thought they’d be used to it. But this is something you just don’t get used to.   This experience has been so eye-opening. You find out who people really are. Some people look and laugh. Some people see you struggling and do nothing. Some people know how hard it is for you and when you ask for help refuse to do anything, making your conditions purposely worse. And then there’s the people who help you. You feel so greatful.   I was forced to go up 3 flights of stairs sometimes four times a day at school. I had to get to my classes and teachers wouldn’t switch me out of some of my classes to make it easier with my mobility issue. I was yelled at instead. I think to myself of all the people in the world needing of help, and then of all the people who are so self centered that they look at a person in need and think if this person got benefits it wouldn’t be fair to everyone else. Isn’t that what benefits are for? The people who need them. They aren’t trying to ‘cheat the system’, they’re trying to live their lives as an equal in the system.   This experience has made me more open minded and at one point in my life I want to work with the handicapped to help them with their issues and to let them know that somebody cares. If more people thought that people were there for them and cared about them then they’d be more caring to others. Love grows. It’s a fact.   I’m still on crutches and will be on them for at least 8 more weeks, equaling a total of 19 weeks. I am now being home schooled because of my handicap.   – Kelsey