There is a phenomenon in social psychology called “bystander effect.” The most famous example of it is the case of Kitty Genovese. She was stabbed to…

There is a phenomenon in social psychology called “bystander effect.” The most famous example of it is the case of Kitty Genovese. She was stabbed to death in 1964, but the thing is, the murder itself lasted for at least half an hour. The murderer had time to run away and then come back to finish off the murder… yet no one notified the police until after the final attack. Shocking, isn’t it? Many heard or observed parts of the incident, but they mostly dismissed it as a “lover’s quarrel” or something less serious than murder.   This incident prompted research into the phenomenon of “bystander effect,” in which the probability of an individual helping in an emergency situation is lower when there are other people, or bystanders present. Psychologists have focused attention on two major factors that may have caused this: social influence (individual observes others & determine whether they should intervene or not –> most people are doing the same thing, so people end up doing nothing) and diffusion of responsibility (the more people there are, the less the individual would feel as if the responsibility is on him or her).   The main point here is…don’t be held under this bystander effect. If you’re one of the bystanders, go help the victim! Don’t be afraid to look silly if it wasn’t really serious, because if it was, you would have helped a lot. If you’re the victim, don’t just wait for help. Grab someone or call someone for help.   – Vivian