At church the other day, the priest gave a sermon which resonated with me. It was about isolating yourself when you feel that the love your core of…

At church the other day, the priest gave a sermon which resonated with me. It was about isolating yourself when you feel that the love your core of being demands isn’t satisfied by people in your life.   “Around me there are crowds of people chattering and giggling, smiling and laughing.   Though I am within this sea of people, I want to swim out. I might as well be dispatched on a remote island, looking off to the distance to see these people laughing and enjoying themselves, activities which I take no active part in.”   Sometimes, when I’m feeling really low, my perception of things is so distorted that I begin to lose sight of the fact that those same people who seem to laugh and enjoy life could be suffering as well.   “But give me a pair of binoculars and through those lens I see a sad face amid the jubilant crowd. On it is an expression of resignation and despondency which my own face mirrors.   As I move my eyes across the sea of people I catch the sight of eyes which don’t match with the smiles. Inside there is hurt.”   When we isolate ourselves from one another, each of us thinking the other as incapable of connecting to our own misgivings and sufferings, we create unnecessary rift and pain. No matter the differences that seem to distinguish us from each other, when you look inside there is always a connecting thread between one person to another.   “We march through life then, each dispatched on our own islands which slowly swim away from one another.”   – Allyson