Obesity has become an alarming problem for Americans especially among its youth. Several things can be attributed to this including the advances in…



Obesity has become an alarming problem for Americans especially among its youth. Several things can be attributed to this including the advances in technology. There’s the argument that adolescents and teens are not being active as they used to be. The youth of today don’t have to adventure to the park for entertainment, they can simply click a few buttons with a remote or game controller from the comfort of their couch or bed. In addition to technology advances, the availability of junk food has become remarkably accessible to the youngest of children. Many schools have started to implement healthy eating programs to try combat this nation’s rising problem. Some say it’s critical not only for limitations to be set on the accessibility of junk food in schools, but also to educate the youngest of the young on how to eat healthier. Healthy eating needs to be a learned behavior so that children implements these practices in their daily lives and continue with them throughout their teen and adult years.


While researching teen obesity, I came across some startling statistics. According to data from 1999-2000, 15 percent of children and teens between the ages of 6 to 19 were overweight (almost 9 million). As an adolescent and preteen, I remember recess being a daily outlet at school to release some of that energy and to get our blood flowing after lunch. It seems that a lot of schools have geared that once recess time to preparation of standardized tests. Does your school offer recess or any other daily alternatives? Are you equipped with the knowledge to make healthy eating decisions?


– Dyanne

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