I didn’t want to believe someone would scam a nonprofit, crisis center for personal financial gain.

I was wrong! This is/was a scam for nonprofits to be aware of. I found out by googling and digging up Random Acts of Flowers encounter with this fake Rob Whitlock.

Donation Scams

Last Thursday, I opened my email to find this…

 

Donation Scams and How to Avoid Them - National Runaway Safeline

$30,000 is a huge gift for the National Runaway Safeline (NRS). I was elated and only mildly suspicious. After all, this was actually my second correspondence with Mr. Whitlock. I had already provided his requested information on NRS funding priorities. I regularly field inquiries on additional information about our agency from potential donors. My response only sometimes secures a donation but more at the $10-$100 level. I wanted so badly to believe $30,000 would be given so easily. That kind of money would pay for our network back-up server or fund our 2017-2021 strategic plan or add a crisis service supervisor for hotline and online services. I didn’t want to believe someone would scam a nonprofit, crisis center for personal financial gain.

I was wrong! This is/was a donation scam for nonprofits to be aware of. I found out by googling and digging up Random Acts of Flowers encounter with this fake Rob Whitlock. Founder and CEO Larsen Jay took time to document the entire scam experience. Larsen shows two screenshots of the exact same emails that I originally received. Luckily, NRS didn’t invest any additional time, energy or dreams in this scam. Random Acts of Flowers did and they wanted to help other nonprofits avoid the same mistake.

Please share this information within the nonprofit community to alert others of the $30,000 scam.

Have any questions about how to deal with donation scams? Leave a comment below and we’ll answer as quickly as possible.

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