WHAT IS THE NATIONAL TRENDS ON YOUTH IN CRISIS IN THE UNITED STATES  REPORT?

The 2017 National Trends on Youth in Crisis in the United States report provides detailed information about the qualities and characteristics of youth in crisis who reached out to the National Runaway Safeline (NRS) in 2017 as well as how those qualities and characteristics have shifted over time—with short-term (2 years), medium-term (5 years), and long-term (10 years) trend horizons.

These two perspectives – the current picture of individuals in crisis and their changes over time– provide a nuanced understanding of the youth that NRS assists. The majority of this report addresses the youth served via NRS, but in some cases does include data related to families and adults as well as friends accessing NRS services on behalf of a youth.

The research findings help ensure that NRS’ understanding of youth in crisis is accurate and up to date, guiding the organization’s priorities and programs toward the most effective strategies, resources and services to keep youth safe and off the streets. NRS and FYSB also hope that by sharing this report, the insights and trends will be helpful to other social service agencies, media, and members of the public who are advocating for, and serving, runaway, homeless and at-risk youth.

For any media inquiries or other questions please contact Erin Famularo at efamularo@1800RUNAWAY.org or call 773-289-1732.

 

Download Full Report (PDF)

 

 

KEY FINDINGS INCLUDE:

 

In 2017, 57% of the youth who connected with NRS were still at home. 68% of youth in crisis who contacted NRS survived through the support of friends/relatives. Family dynamics was the most commonly raised issue in 2017 (33%).

  • 57% of the youth who connected with the National Runaway Safeline in 2017 were still at home.
  • 68% of youth in crisis who contacted NRS survived through the support of friends/relatives.
  • Family dynamics were the most common issue raised by youth in 2017 (33%).

GENDER

Over the past two years, NRS experienced a 68% increase in connections with youth identifying as gender non-conforming and a 46% increase in connections with youth identifying as transgender.

  • Over the past 2 years, NRS experienced a 68% increase in connections with youth identifying as gender non-conforming and a 46% increase in connections with youth identifying as transgender.

AGE

Over the past 5 years, crisis connections from younger youth have increased.

  • Crisis connections from younger youth have increased significantly over 5 years.

RACE AND ETHNICITY

Black or African Americans make up a larger proportion of youth in crisis connecting to NRS (23%) than their proportion in the general youth population according to the Current Population Survey (14%).

  • Black or African Americans make up a larger proportion of youth who contact NRS (23%) than their proportion in the general youth population according to the Current Population Survey (14%).

TIME ON THE STREET

There has been a 30% increase in connections with youth who have been on the street for 3-6 months or longer.

  • There was a 42% increase in both youth who contacted NRS while still at home AND youth who were on the street in the past 10 years.
  • The number of youth who connected with NRS while with the police decreased by 111% over 10 years.

ISSUES EXPERIENCED

There was a 65% increase in youth crisis connections with NRS who experienced abuse and neglect over he last 5 years. There was also a 32% increase in youth in crisis who experienced transportation issues over the past 2 years.

  • In the last 5 years, NRS saw a 65% increase in youth crisis connections who experienced abuse and neglect.
  • NRS also saw a 32% increase in youth in crisis who experienced transportation issues over the past 2 years.

Read the full report for more details.

 

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